Reveling in Ravenel’s Rattlesnake Master

Late summer/early fall is show season for Eryngium aquaticum var. ravenelii…a superb southeast native plant that’s almost unknown by native plant enthusiasts. In the wild, it grows in seasonally flooded ditches, but in the garden at JLBG, our plants thrive in typical garden soil with an average amount of moisture. Here are our plants flowering now…each filled with an array of pollinators.

Cooking up a Joe-Pye

We wanted to create a buffet for local butterflies by our patio, and a mass planting of Eupatorium purpureum ‘Little Red’ did just the trick. Not bad for a highway ditch native.

Artful Artemisia

We’ve long prized artemisias in the garden, many for their wonderful silver foliage and amazing texture. We’ve always had a love/hate relationship with the North American native Artemisia ludoviciana. This widespread native (or naturalized species) occurs in every US state between Canada and Mexico, and is divided into eight subspecies. Below is our specimen of a superb collection by Patrick McMillan from Gillespie County, Texas that we call Artemisia ‘Fredericksburg’. We find this a much better plant than the commonly sold Artemisia ‘Valerie Finnis’ and ‘Silver King’, both of which have coarser foliage and spread too fast for our taste. All forms of Artemisia ludoviciana spread to some extent, so be sure to locate it in a sunny location where it can romp.

Sac-a-who?

The native Camassia leichtlinii ‘Sacajawea’ is looking great at JLBG today. This selection of the US West Coast native thrives also here in the hot, humid, southeast US. This selection was named after Sacajawea, the a member of the Lemhi Shoshone tribe, who helped guide explorers Lewis and Clark in the early 1800s. When food became short due to cold weather, she taught them to collect and eat camassia to survive. We’re excited to grow her namesake in our garden.

Camassia leichtlinii ‘Sacajawea’

Baptisias: Great American Natives!

Baptisias, commonly known as false indigo, are North American native members of the pea family and quite drought tolerant once established. They provide amazing architectural form in a sunny garden or perennial border, and are deer-resistant and a butterfly magnet (See the top 25 flowers that attract butterflies here.).

image of Baptisia 'Blueberry Sundae'

Not only do baptisia come in blue, which many people are familiar with in the most common species, B. australis, but they are also available in a wide array of colors such as white, yellow, purple, and pink, and new breeding efforts are producing bicolor flowers such as those of Lunar Eclipse.

Baptisias have long been one of our favorite groups of sun perennials here at PDN. Through our trials of new varieties introduced  to the market, as well as our own breeding program, we continue to select for improved structure and habit as well as flower color. In 2017, we have introduced 2 new varieties in our Tower Series, Yellow Towers and Ivory Towers. These join our previous introduction, Blue Towers, all having a vigorous upright habit to 4.5-5′, terminating in 18-20″ spikes of flowers, true show-stoppers in the garden.

image of Baptisia 'Yellow Towers'

Baptisia ‘Yellow Towers’

Due to high demand, we quickly sold out of finished stock of Ivory Towers, but don’t fret, we have another crop coming along and they should be ready just in time for our Spring Open Nursery & Garden Days April 28-30 and May 5-7. And be sure to join us on Sunday May 7 at 2pm for our Gardening Unplugged garden chat series, where Tony will be talking about baptisias. You can also read Tony’s more in depth article about baptisias, here.

Baptisia in the garden

Baptisia Cherries Jubilee4

Here’s Baptisia ‘Cherries Jubilee‘ in the garden…a unique butterscotch and brown flower…a Hans Hansen hybrid.

Baptisia Lemon Meraingue12Here is another recent baptisia photo from the garden…Baptisia ‘Lemon Meringue‘ looking mighty fine.  Baptisia thrive in either dry or wet soils as long as they have 6+ hours of sun.

Silene ‘Jackson Valentine’

Silene virginica Jackson Valentine6Silene ‘Jackson Valentine‘ is one of those plants you just can’t help but photograph.  In fact, I seem to wind up taking a new picture each day during its spring flowering season. Here it is in the garden yesterday in all it’s radiance.  This incredible native thrives in part sun with good drainage.  It just doesn’t get much better than this.

 

 

Stunning baptisias in the garden

Baptisia Blueberry Sunday5 (2)

The baptisias are looking fabulous in the garden now.  Here’s Baptisia ‘Blueberry Sundae’, a hybrid from Hans Hansen of Walters Gardens.  Baptisias are as drought tolerant as catus, but can also grow equally well streamside with their roots in standing water.

Baptisia Cherries Jubilee4

 

Here is our clump of Hans’ Baptisia ‘Cherries Jubilee’ with a nice bicolor brown flower.Baptisia Lemon Meraingue12This is Hans’ Baptisia ‘Lemon Meringue’ in the garden…pretty amazing.

Baptisia Blue Towers21If you want a more vertical accent, Here is our Baptisia ‘Blue Towers’ in the garden today. If you have full sun, we hope you’ll add these great native plant selections to your garden.

 

 

Iris cristata in flower

Iris cristata Montrose White

The dwarf native woodland iris, Iris cristata are in flower here today.  Iris ‘Montrose White’ was introduced by Montrose Gardens in NC.  Iris cristata is native in shade, but flowers much better when given a couple of hours of sun.

Iris cristata Powder Blue GiantIris cristata ‘Powder Blue Giant’ is incredibly floriferous in the garden today.  These spring flowering groundcovers are just delightful.